Andy Clark on Emotions, Cognition and the Predictive Mind

Andy Clark is a professor of philosophy and Chair in Logic and Metaphysics at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

“To unravel the workings of these embodied, embedded, and sometimes extended minds requires an unusual mix of neuroscience, computational, dynamical, and information-theoretic understandings, “brute” physiology, ecological sensitivity, and attention to the stacked designer cocoons in which we grow, work, think, and act. This may seem a daunting prospect, but there is cause for optimism. In learning, development, and evolution, trade-offs among neural control, bodily morphology, action, and the canny use of environmental resources and opportunities are regularly and reliably achieved.” – Andy Clark, Supersizing the Mind (2008)

Below professor Clark speaks at the event “Feeling Reasons: The Role of Emotions in Reasoning”, held at the University of Edinburgh, 24th-26th May 2017:

Feeling Reasons. The Role of Emotions in Reasoning
University of Edinburgh, 24th-26th May 2017

The primary goals of the International Conference are to discuss the ongoing approaches about:

1. the role of emotions in logico-rational processes;
2. the cognitively-motivational states involving emotive elements;
3. the role of emotions in self-knowledge, embodied and embedded cognition, dialogical inquiry, and group knowledge;
4. the integrated functionality between the rational and the emotional dimensions of the mental;
5. emotions, cognitive success and risk.

The International Conference was organized under the aegis of the European Philosophical Society for the Study of Emotions (EPSSE). It is made possible thanks to the generous funding of the Scots Philosophical Association, the Mind Association, Eidyn Research Centre, Department of Philosophy (University of Edinburgh).

2 responses to “Andy Clark on Emotions, Cognition and the Predictive Mind

  1. Pingback: The Knowledge Ecology | Knowledge Ecology·

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