Archive

Monthly Archives: June 2013

Why is deception such an essential part of the human condition? What evolutionary purpose does it fulfill? How can we recognize it on an individual level, and overcome it on a societal level in a modern democracy?
Evolutionary biologist Robert Trivers, social psychologist Carol Tavris, neurobiologists and laboratory directors at Barrow Neurological Institute Stephen Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde, magicians Jamy Ian Swiss and Joshua Jay, and Origins Project director and moderator Lawrence Krauss as they discuss the biological, behavioral, and political boundaries of this controversial issue.
Link to Q&A – Part 2/2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMm3Kn..

Emergency? Of what kind, where, affecting who? In most recent global history, a number of monumental incidents of a political nature, many of which fall under a larger concept of “biopower,” put the world into a state of crisis. The dismantling of socialist states in the (former) Eastern Europe and of welfare democracies in the (former) West, and more recent events such as 9/11, the war in Iraq, the bombings in London and Madrid, as well as devastating natural disasters such as last year’s tsunami and hurricane “Katrina,” have chipped away at the promise of global mobility and economic prosperity, and contributed to a general sentiment of immense instability and permanent danger across the world. This situation has placed all levels of public life in a confrontational mode, forcing everyone to face the crisis and refine ways of governance according to the new circumstances. Crisis, as a catalyst for change, is a paradoxical agent. At the same time it signals a shift in the existing power structures, it also provides an opportunity, or excuse, for their reinforcement. Jeremiah Day, Jan Verwoert, and Klub Zwei discuss the notion of crisis in our present-day world, and look back upon some historical examples. Specifically, alternative models of governance and political response are considered by re-posing the question: How can critical artistic and intellectual practice address these contexts and propose another path?

Ruth Ozeki and the Trials of Switching Off

Just started reading zen priest, novelist, and documentary filmmaker Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale For The Time Being and came across this related talk on how the internet is changing our experiences of writing, do check out thesalon link to read an overview of the talk.

A_Tale_For_The_Time_Being

david-harvey

AUDIO: David Harvey ‘Seventeen Contradictions and The End of Capitalism’

In this lecture drawing on his new ‘Seventeen Contradictions and The End of Capitalism’ David Harvey will explore the way capital works, how systemic contradictions are socially and spatially constructed, and ask whether these contradictions and inequalities generate new political and cultural pathways beyond capitalism.

Over the last four decades David Harvey has illuminated a new geographical and cultural understanding of the way capitalism operates. Beyond his extraordinary scholarly contributions however perhaps what is equally remarkable is the public reach of his writing and teaching. David Harvey’s recent online lecture courses and interventions not only reassert the legacy of Marx’s theory, his work inspires something quite new – a spirit of autodidactism, organic learning and a sense that the public realm is a field of education and political optimism.

http://davidharvey.org/

Systems thinker Tom Andersen, in being “a wanderer and worrier” (as he put it), was constantly reflecting on his own practice, on his way of ‘going on’, to further develop and refine it. Each new way came to him, he said, on reaching a ‘crossroads’, a point when he felt unable to continue any longer in the same way. But once he stopped doing what he had come to see as ethically wrong, he found, he said, that the “alternatives popped up almost by themselves”.
It is what the nature of that imaginative judgmental work feels like, looks like, and sounds like that Shotter discuss in this talk.
http://pubpages.unh.edu/~jds/